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By getting students moving you’re supporting their emotional well-being, helping them to develop a positive self-concept, and improving their ability to cope with stress1.

Physical activity helps prevent and manage anxiety1 and at the same time increases endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain which benefits overall happiness3. Including time to get active in your class helps students feel happier, recharged, and ready to take on the rest of their day with a smile!

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Participating in physical activity helps improve positive social outcomes for students – boosting their self-esteem and encouraging stronger relationships with peers and adults4.

When students take part in physical activity they are given opportunities to build interpersonal skills and foster healthy relationships. Students develop respect for others while figuring out their own place in their class, school, and community5 – a place where they belong.

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Being physically active, even for a short time, has shown to increase student academic performance6.

Looking for your students to improve their results in class? Getting them active might be the answer! Taking an active break to move will actually help students increase their memory, observation, problem-solving and decision making skills. And to top it off they’ll be better engaged to learn more – as getting active improves behaviour, discipline, and creativity7.

20 minutes
of in-class movement
makes it possible.

At Ophea we passionately believe that all children deserve to enjoy the lifelong benefits of healthy, active living. We are dedicated to providing educators the resources and services needed for ensuring an early and positive attitude towards physical activity.

The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (ages 5-17) recommends at least 60 minutes of moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) per day for children and youth. Getting students active for 20 minutes during class time as part of the Daily Physical Activity (DPA) policy (PPM 138) helps them reach 60 minutes a day!

Share this with your fellow educators and let’s get all Ontario classrooms moving.

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For resources, professional learning opportunities, and information to support you in getting kids active visit Ophea.net.

Ophea is a not-for-profit organization that champions healthy, active living in schools and communities through quality programs and services, partnerships and advocacy. Ophea's vision is that all children and youth will value and enjoy the lifelong benefits of healthy, active living.

References

1. Canada. Ontario. Ministry of Education. 2015 H&PE elementary Curriculum Revised Edition (Toronto: Ontario Ministry of Education 2015), 7. Available: Link to PDF

2. Biddle, S. J. H., and M. Asare. "Physical activity and mental health in children and adolescents: A review of reviews." British Journal of Sports Medicine 45, no. 11 (2011): 886-95. http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/45/11/886.abstract.

3. Nieman, P. "Psychosocial aspects of physical activity." Paediatrics & Child Health, 7, no. 5 (2002): 309-12.

4. Bangsbo, J., P. Kustrup, J. Duda et al. "Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016: children, youth, and physical activity in schools and during leisure time." British Journal of Sports Medicine 50, no. 19 (2016): 1177-78.

5. Canada. Ontario. Ministry of Education. 2015 H&PE elementary Curriculum Revised Edition (Toronto: Ontario Ministry of Education, 2015), 25. Available: Link to PDF

6. Bangsbo, J., P. Kustrup, J. Duda et al. "Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016: children, youth, and physical activity in schools and during leisure time." British Journal of Sports Medicine 50, no. 19 (2016): 1177-78.

7. Keays, J.J., and K.R. Allison. "The effects of regular moderate to vigorous physical activity on student outcomes: A review." Canadian Journal of Public Health 86, no. 1 (1995): 64.


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